Virat Kohli

From Bharatpedia, an open encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Virat Kohli
Virat Kohli.jpg
Personal information
Born (1988-11-05) 5 November 1988 (age 33)
Delhi, India
NicknameCheeku[1]
Height5 ft 9 in (175 cm) [2]
BattingRight-handed
BowlingRight-arm medium
RoleTop-order batsman
Relations
(
m. 2017)

International information
National side
Test debut (cap 269)20 June 2011 v West Indies
Last Test11 January 2022 v South Africa
ODI debut (cap 175)18 August 2008 v Sri Lanka
Last ODI28 March 2021 v England
ODI shirt no.18
T20I debut (cap 31)12 June 2010 v Zimbabwe
Last T20I8 November 2021 v Namibia
T20I shirt no.18
Domestic team information
YearsTeam
2006–presentDelhi
2008–presentRoyal Challengers Bangalore (squad no. 18)
Career statistics
Competition Test ODI T20I FC
Matches 99 254 91 130
Runs scored 7,962 12,169 3,216 10,103
Batting average 50.39 59.07 52.04 51.28
100s/50s 27/28 43/62 0/29 34/35
Top score 254* 183 94* 254*
Balls bowled 175 641 146 643
Wickets 0 4 4 3
Bowling average 166.25 49.50 112.66
5 wickets in innings 0 0 0
10 wickets in match 0 0 0
Best bowling 1/15 1/13 1/19
Catches/stumpings 98/– 132/– 42/– 129/–
Source: ESPNcricinfo,, 11 January 2022

Virat Kohli (Hindustani: [ʋɪˈɾɑːʈ ˈkoːɦliː] (About this soundlisten); born 5 November 1988) is an Indian cricketer. He plays for Delhi in domestic cricket and Royal Challengers Bangalore in the Indian Premier League as a right-handed batsman. Kohli is often considered one of the best cricket players in the world and widely regarded as one of the greatest cricket players of all time.[3]

Kohli made his Test debut in 2011.[4] He reached the number one spot in the ICC rankings for ODI batsmen for the first time in 2013.[5] He has won Man of the Tournament twice at the ICC World Twenty20 (in 2014 and 2016). He also holds the world record of being the fastest to 23,000 international runs.[6]

Kohli has been the recipient of many awards– most notably the Sir Garfield Sobers Trophy (ICC Men's Cricketer of the Decade): 2011–2020; Sir Garfield Sobers Trophy (ICC Cricketer of the Year) in 2017 and 2018; ICC Test Player of the Year (2018); ICC ODI Player of the Year (2012, 2017, 2018) and Wisden Leading Cricketer in the World (2016, 2017 and 2018).[7] At the national level, he was awarded the Arjuna Award in 2013, the Padma Shri under the sports category in 2017[8] and the Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna award, the highest sporting honour in India, in 2018.[9] He is ranked as one of the world's most famous athletes by ESPN[10] and one of the most valuable athlete brands by Forbes.[11] In 2018, Time magazine named him one of the 100 most influential people in the world.[12] In 2020, he was ranked 66th in Forbes list of the top 100 highest-paid athletes in the world for the year 2020 with estimated earnings of over $26 million.[13]

Early life[edit | edit source]

Virat Kohli was born on 5 November 1988 in Delhi into a Punjabi Hindu family.[14] His father, Prem Kohli, worked as a criminal lawyer and his mother, Saroj Kohli, is a housewife.[15][16] He has an older brother, Vikash, and an older sister, Bhavna.[17]

Kohli was raised in Uttam Nagar[18] and started his schooling at Vishal Bharti Public School.[15][19] In 1998, the West Delhi Cricket Academy was created and a nine-year-old Kohli was part of its first intake.[18] Kohli trained at the academy under Rajkumar Sharma[16] and also played matches at the Sumeet Dogra Academy at Vasundhara Enclave at the same time.[18] In ninth grade, he shifted to Saviour Convent in Paschim Vihar to help his cricket practice.[15][20] Kohli's family lived in Meera Bagh until 2015 when they moved to Gurgaon.[21]

Kohli's father died on 18 December 2006 due to a stroke after being bed-ridden for a month.[15]

Personal life[edit | edit source]

Kohli with wife Anushka Sharma in their Mumbai reception

Kohli started dating Bollywood actress Anushka Sharma in 2013; the couple soon earned the celebrity couple nickname "Virushka".[22][23] Their relationship attracted substantial media attention, with persistent rumours and speculations in the media, as neither of the two publicly talked about it.[24] The couple married on 11 December 2017 in a private ceremony in Florence, Italy.[25][26] On 11 January 2021, they became parents to a baby girl, Vamika.[27]

In 2018, Kohli revealed that he completely stopped consuming meat to cut down his uric acid levels which caused him a cervical spine issue and started affecting his finger and, in turn, his batting.[28][29][30] In 2021, he clarified that he is a vegetarian and not a vegan.[31]

Kohli has admitted that he is superstitious. He used to wear black wristbands as a cricket superstition; earlier, he used to wear the same pair of gloves with which he had "been scoring". Apart from a religious black thread, he has also been wearing a kara on his right arm since 2012.[32]

Career[edit | edit source]

Player profile[edit | edit source]

Playing style[edit | edit source]

Kohli playing his famous flick shot in CWC 2015

Kohli is a naturally aggressive batsman[33] with strong technical skills.[34] He usually bats at the no.3 position in ODI cricket.[35] He bats with a slightly open-chested stance[36][37] and a strong bottom-hand grip.[38][39] He is not a big hitter, so he can not hit big sixes and plays more grounded shots.[40] He is known for his wide range of shots, ability to pace an innings and batting under pressure.[41][42][43] He is strong through the mid-wicket and cover region.[44] He has said that the cover drive is his favourite shot, while also saying that the flick shot comes naturally to him.[17] He does not play the sweep shot often, being called "not a natural sweeper of the cricket ball".[45] Kohli is strong on leg stump line bowling. If bowled at leg stump he plays flick shot.[46]
According to cricket pundit VVS Laxman, for Virat Kohli, balling line outside the off stump is his weakness. He got out many times by outside off stump line ball and opposition team's bowlers tries to exploit his weakness in Test as well as ODIs[47][46] Out swinging balls his one of the weakness as per Richard Hadlee.[48]
His teammates have praised his confidence, commitment, focus and work ethics.[49][50][51] Kohli is also known to be a "sharp" fielder.[52][53]
Kohli is regarded as the best limited-overs batsman in the world, especially while chasing.[54][3] In ODIs, he averages around 69 in matches batting second as opposed to around 51 batting first.[55] 26 of his 43 ODI hundreds have come in run-chases and he holds the record for most hundreds batting second.[56]

Aggression[edit | edit source]

Kohli is noted for his on-field aggression and was described in the media as "brash" and "arrogant" during his early career.[51][57] He has got into confrontations with players and umpires on several occasions.[51][58] While many former cricketers have backed his aggressive attitude,[59][60][61] some have criticised it.[51][62] In 2012, Kohli had stated that he tries to limit his aggressive behaviour but "the build-up and the pressure or the special occasions make it tough to control the aggression."[63]

Comparisons to Sachin Tendulkar[edit | edit source]

Kohli is often compared to Sachin Tendulkar, due to their similar styles of batting, and sometimes referred to as Tendulkar's "successor".[64][65] Many former cricketers expect Kohli to break Tendulkar's batting records.[9] He is ranked as one of the world's most famous athletes by ESPN[10] Kohli has stated that growing up his idol and role model was Tendulkar and that as a kid he "tried to copy the shots [Tendulkar] played and hit sixes the way he used to hit them."[11] Former West Indies great Vivian Richards, who is regarded as the most destructive batsman in cricket, stated that Kohli reminds him of himself.[66] In early 2015, Richards said Kohli was "already legendary" in the ODI format,[67] while former Australian cricketer Dean Jones called Kohli the "new king of world cricket".[14] Aakash Chopra, an Indian commentator, stated that "Sachin had more shots as compared to Virat".[68]

Career summary[edit | edit source]

As of December 2021, Kohli has made 70 centuries and 7 double centuries in international cricket—27 centuries, 7 double centuries in Test cricket and 43 centuries in One Day Internationals (ODIs).[lower-alpha 1][lower-alpha 2]

Test match performance[edit | edit source]

  Batting[69] Fielding[70]
Opposition Matches Runs Average High score 200s/100s / 50s Catches
Australia 20 1682 48.05 169 0/7/5 20
Bangladesh 4 392 78.40 204 1/2/0 5
England 27 1960 43.55 235 1/5/9 24
New Zealand 11 866 45.57 211 1/3/3 15
South Africa 14 1236 56.18 254* 1/3/4 10
Sri Lanka 9 1004 77.23 243 2/5/2 9
West Indies 14 822 43.26 200 1/2/5 17
Overall 99 7962 50.39 254* 7/27/28 100
An innings–by–innings breakdown of Kohli's Test batting career, showing runs scored (blue and red (not out) bars) and the black line is his career batting average.

ODI match performance[edit | edit source]

  Batting[71] Fielding[72]
Opposition Matches Runs Average High score 100s / 50s Catches
Afghanistan 2 67 67.00 67 0 / 1 2
Australia 43 208 54.81 123 8 / 10 26
Bangladesh 12 680 75.55 136 3 / 3 5
England 33 1307 45.06 122 3 / 9 16
Ireland 2 78 78 44* 0 / 0 0
Netherlands 1 12 12 12 0 / 0 0
New Zealand 26 1378 59.91 154* 5 / 8 9
Pakistan 13 536 48.72 183 2 / 5 7
South Africa 27 1287 64.35 160* 4 / 6 21
Sri Lanka 47 2220 60 139* 8 / 11 22
U.A.E 1 33 33* 0 / 0 0
West Indies 39 2235 72.09 157* 9 / 11 20
Zimbabwe 8 253 50.60 115 1 / 1 4
Overall 254 12169 59.07 183 43 / 62 132
An innings–by–innings breakdown of Kohli's ODI batting career, showing runs scored (blue and red (not out) bars) and the black line is his career batting average.

T20I match performance[edit | edit source]

  Batting[73] Fielding[74]
Opposition Matches Runs Average High score 100s / 50s Catches
Afghanistan 1 1 50 50 0/1 0
Australia 19 718 59.83 90* 0/ 7 9
Bangladesh 4 129 64.50 57* 0/ 1 3
England 17 577 44.38 80* 0 / 4 9
Ireland 2 9 4.5 9 0 / 0 1
New Zealand 9 302 37.5 70 0/ 2 3
Pakistan 6 254 84.66 78* 0 / 2 3
South Africa 10 254 36.28 72* 0 / 2 3
Sri Lanka 7 339 84.75 82 0/ 4 4
U.A.E 1 0 / 0 1
West Indies 12 501 62.62 94 0 / 5 6
Zimbabwe 2 26 26* 0 / 0 0
Overall 90 3159 52.65 94* 0 / 28 42
An innings–by–innings breakdown of Kohli's T20I batting career, showing runs scored (blue and red (not out) bars) and the black line is his career batting average.

Records[edit | edit source]

Virat Kohli is leading run scorer in T20I with most 50 plus scores.[75] He is the only cricketer to have been awarded player of the tournament twice in T20 World Cup.[75] He scored 319 runs with 4 fifties in T20 World Cup 2014 and was leading run scorer in the tournament.[76]

He has 2nd most centuries in ODI(43) and only behind Tendulkar who has 49 centuries.[77] He has 3rd most centuries(70) in international cricket and only behind Tendulkar(100) and Ponting(71).[78] He is the fastest player to score 10,000 runs in ODI in terms of innings and took 54 less innings than previous record of 259 innings.[79] In 2018, He scored 1000 ODI runs in just 11 innings which is the least number of innings taken to score 1000 runs in a calendar year.[80]

Awards[edit | edit source]

Kohli receiving the Padma Shri award from President Pranab Mukherjee in March 2017
Kohli meeting Prime Minister of India Narendra Modi in New Delhi in 2017

National honours[edit | edit source]

Sporting honours[edit | edit source]

Other honours and awards[edit | edit source]

Awards
Preceded by
Kumar Sangakkara
ICC ODI Player of the Year
2012
Succeeded by
Kumar Sangakkara
Preceded by
Ravichandran Ashwin
Sir Garfield Sobers Trophy
2017–2018
Succeeded by
Ben Stokes
Preceded by
Quinton de Kock
ICC ODI Player of the Year
2017–2018
Succeeded by
Rohit Sharma
Preceded by
Steve Smith
ICC Test Player of the Year
2018
Succeeded by
Pat Cummins

Outside cricket[edit | edit source]

Commercial investments[edit | edit source]

According to Kohli, football is his second favourite sport.[106] In 2014, Kohli became a co-owner of Indian Super League club FC Goa. He stated that he invested in the club with the "keenness of football" and because he "wanted football to grow in India".[107] He added, "It's a business venture for me for the future. Cricket's not going to last forever and I'm keeping all my options open after retirement."[106]

In September 2015, Kohli became a co-owner of the International Premier Tennis League franchise UAE Royals,[108] and, in December that year, became a co-owner of the JSW-owned Bengaluru Yodhas franchise in Pro Wrestling League.[109]

In November 2014, Kohli and Anjana Reddy's Universal Sportsbiz (USPL) launched a youth fashion brand WROGN.[lower-alpha 3] The brand started to produce men's casual wear clothing in 2015 and has tied up with Myntra and Shopper's Stop.[110] In late 2014, Kohli was announced as a shareholder and brand ambassador of the social networking venture 'Sport Convo' based in London.

In 2015, Kohli invested 900 million (US$13 million) to start a chain of gyms and fitness centres across the country. Launched under the name Chisel, the chain of gyms is jointly owned by Kohli, Chisel India and CSE (Cornerstone Sport and Entertainment), the agency which manages Kohli's commercial interests.[111] In 2016, Kohli started Stepathlon Kids, a children fitness venture, in partnership with Stepathlon Lifestyle.[112]

[113]

Charity[edit | edit source]

Kohli at a VKF charity event in June 2016

In March 2013, Kohli started a charity foundation called Virat Kohli Foundation (VKF). The organisation aims at helping underprivileged kids and conducts events to raise funds for the charity.[114] According to Kohli, the foundation works with select NGOs to "create awareness, seek support and raise funds for the various causes they endorse and the philanthropic work they engage in."[115] In May 2014, eBay and Save the Children India conducted a charity auction with VKF, with its proceeds benefiting the education and healthcare of underprivileged children.[116]

Kohli has captained the All Heart Football Club, owned by VKF, in charity football matches against All Stars Football Club, owned by Abhishek Bachchan's Playing for Humanity. The matches, known as "Celebrity Clasico", feature cricketers playing for All Heart and Bollywood actors in the All Stars team, and are organized to generate funds for the two charity foundations.[117]

Social media fan following[edit | edit source]

Kohli is very active on social media and has a huge fan following on the platform.[118] He is the only cricketer, and fifth sports personality, to have more than 150 million followers on Instagram.[119]

In popular culture[edit | edit source]

  • Super V (Super Virat), an Indian animated superhero television series portrays a fictionalized version of Kohli's teen years where he discovers hidden superpowers.[121]
  • Mega Icons (2018-2020), an Indian documentary television series on National Geographic about prominent Indian personalities, dedicated an episode to Kohli's achievements in cricket.[122]

See also[edit | edit source]

Notes[edit | edit source]

  1. Kohli is yet to score a T20I century.
  2. Kohli is behind Sachin Tendulkar (100) and Ricky Ponting (71) in the all-time list.
  3. It redirects to WROGN not to be confused with Wrong

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "'My big ears and cheeks stood out' - Virat Kohli reveals hilarious story behind his nickname 'Cheeku'". Hindustan Times. 3 April 2020. Retrieved 7 September 2021.
  2. "See Who Is The Tallest Player In The Indian Team". Cricket Addictor. 8 January 2022. Retrieved 7 September 2021.
  3. 3.0 3.1 * "ICC World Twenty20: Virat Kohli best batsman in the world, says Sunil Gavaskar". India Today. Archived from the original on 11 July 2016. Retrieved 13 July 2016.
  4. "India vs South Africa 2013: Post-Tendulkar era begins, Virat Kohli shines". Zee News. 18 December 2013. Archived from the original on 18 May 2015. Retrieved 12 May 2015.
  5. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named odirank
  6. "Virat Kohli breaks Sachin Tendulkar's long-standing world record during 4th Test against England". Hindustan Times. 2 September 2021. Retrieved 3 September 2021.
  7. "Virat Kohli completes hat-trick, named Wisden's 'Leading Cricketer' for third straight year". Hindustan Times. 10 April 2019. Retrieved 4 September 2021.
  8. 8.0 8.1 "Virat Kohli receives Padma Shri Award at Rashtrapati Bhavan". The Indian Express. 31 March 2017. Archived from the original on 30 August 2017. Retrieved 1 November 2017.
  9. 9.0 9.1 "Virat Kohli, Mirabai Chanu conferred with Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna Award". The Indian Express. 25 September 2018. Retrieved 26 October 2021.
  10. 10.0 10.1 "ESPN's World Fame 100". ESPN. Archived from the original on 13 July 2016. Retrieved 13 July 2016.
  11. 11.0 11.1 "Virat Kohli ranked 7th biggest brand in world sports by Forbes". Forbes. Archived from the original on 21 February 2018.
  12. Diesel, Vin. "virat kohli". Time. Retrieved 5 June 2018.
  13. "Virat Kohli only cricketer in Forbes' top 100 highest-paid athletes of 2020". Hindustan Times. 30 May 2020. Retrieved 3 June 2020.
  14. 14.0 14.1 Gupta, Vikrant (14 December 2012). "Even today the money cricketers make is not enough: Kapil Dev in conversation with Virat Kohli". India Today. Archived from the original on 11 July 2015. Retrieved 27 September 2021.
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 15.3 Ganguly, Arghya (3 March 2008). "Virat changed after his dad's death: Mother". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 27 February 2015. Retrieved 27 September 2021.
  16. 16.0 16.1 Sahi, Lokendra Pratap (7 March 2011). "Being aggressive comes naturally: Virat Kohli - Young turk speaks about his likes and Dislikes". The Telegraph. Archived from the original on 17 September 2018. Retrieved 27 September 2021.
  17. 17.0 17.1 Gollapudi, Nagraj (3 June 2015). "This is Virat". The Cricket Monthly. ESPNcricinfo. Archived from the original on 9 June 2015. Retrieved 3 June 2015.
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 Nath, Deepika (24 February 2011). "Cricketer Virat Kohli - India's latest sex symbol?". The Indian Express. Archived from the original on 16 February 2018. Retrieved 27 September 2021.
  19. "Successful Alumni / Vishal Bharti Public School". Archived from the original on 27 May 2015. Retrieved 27 May 2015.
  20. Das, Devadyuti (25 March 2012). "Superstar Virat Kohli goes back to school". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 3 March 2018. Retrieved 27 September 2021.
  21. Mathur, Abhimanyu; Bhatia, Saloni (3 April 2016). "Virat Kohli: Delhi's golden boy since 2002". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 27 April 2016. Retrieved 27 September 2021.
  22. "Finally! Anushka Sharma confesses love for Virat Kohli in this new TVC". 21 October 2017. Archived from the original on 23 October 2017.
  23. "Virat Kohli's post supporting Anushka Sharma declared the 'Golden Tweet' of 2016". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 7 December 2016. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  24. "Virat Kohli swears by girlfriend Anushka, abuses HT journalist". Hindustan Times. 3 March 2015. Archived from the original on 22 April 2015. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  25. "It's official: Anushka Sharma and Virat Kohli are married". The Express Tribune. 11 December 2017. Archived from the original on 12 December 2017. Retrieved 11 December 2017.
  26. "Virat Kohli officially announces marriage to Anushka Sharma, Twitter goes berserk". Hindustan Times. 11 December 2017. Archived from the original on 12 December 2017. Retrieved 11 December 2017.
  27. "Virat Kohli and Anushka Sharma blessed with baby girl". www.businesstoday.in. Retrieved 13 January 2021.
  28. Oct 7, Indranil Basu / TNN / Updated; 2018; Ist, 15:47. "Virat Kohli: Captain Kohli turns vegan, feels it has improved his game | Cricket News - Times of India". The Times of India. Retrieved 2 January 2021.CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  29. "Happy Birthday Captain: When Virat Kohli turned vegan and said bye-bye to meat and dairy products". Free Press Journal. Retrieved 2 January 2021.
  30. "Virat Kohli reveals reason behind turning into a vegan in Instagram live with Kevin Pietersen". The New Indian Express. Retrieved 3 January 2021.
  31. "Virat Kohli Says "Never Claimed To Be Vegan, I'm Vegetarian" | Cricket News". NDTVSports.com. Retrieved 1 June 2021.
  32. "World Cup 2015: Cricketers and their superstitions". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 26 March 2017. Retrieved 17 January 2016.
  33. "Emerging into his own". ESPNcricinfo. 7 August 2008. Archived from the original on 14 July 2014. Retrieved 9 July 2014.
  34. "Kohli says proper technique behind his quickfire tons". ESPNcricinfo. November 2013. Archived from the original on 4 June 2015. Retrieved 9 July 2014.
  35. "HowSTAT! ODI Cricket - Virat Kohli - Batting Analysis by Batting Position". www.howstat.com. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  36. "Kohli, Pujara Caught in Mindfield?". The New Indian Express. Archived from the original on 1 November 2014. Retrieved 11 October 2014.
  37. "Virat Kohli, Gautam Gambhir, Murali Vijay: India let down by batsmen at Old Trafford". india.com. 7 August 2014. Archived from the original on 14 August 2014. Retrieved 11 October 2014.
  38. "The Kohli method". ESPNcricinfo. 13 September 2012. Archived from the original on 13 December 2015. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  39. "Not getting into swing of things, Virat on his knees". The Tribune. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  40. "Virat: Can't hit big sixes, so I focus on boundaries". www.telegraphindia.com. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  41. "Kohli sharpened under pressure". ESPNcricinfo. 4 April 2014. Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 9 July 2014.
  42. "Virat Kohli: India batsman has talent, temperament and cricketing intelligence in droves". Sky Sports. Archived from the original on 14 July 2014. Retrieved 9 July 2014.
  43. Wilson, Andy (5 July 2014). "India's Virat Kohli has swagger and substance to trouble England". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 9 July 2014. Retrieved 9 July 2014.
  44. "Virat Kohli: The flag-bearer of Indian cricket". NDTV. Archived from the original on 10 August 2014. Retrieved 8 August 2014.
  45. "Kohli rises, India go down". Cricbuzz. Retrieved 6 June 2015.
  46. 46.0 46.1 "Kohli's weakness grows wider". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  47. "Virat Kohli is repeating his mistake: VVS Laxman highlights Indian skipper's weakness ahead of 4th Test". www.timesnownews.com. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  48. Dinakar, S. "Richard Hadlee: Southee is Kohli's weakness". Sportstar. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  49. "What Kohli taught Yuvraj". ESPNcricinfo. 11 April 2012. Archived from the original on 14 July 2014. Retrieved 9 July 2014.
  50. Villiers, A. b De (8 May 2016). "Virat Kohli is pure class - A.B. de Villiers". The Hindu. Archived from the original on 3 March 2018. Retrieved 24 June 2016.
  51. 51.0 51.1 51.2 51.3 Sharma, Aabhas (8 November 2013). "Why Virat Kohli is who he is". Business Standard India. Business Standard. Archived from the original on 23 April 2015. Retrieved 1 June 2015.
  52. "India seek comfort in youth". ESPNcricinfo. 8 September 2011. Archived from the original on 4 June 2015. Retrieved 26 April 2015.
  53. "Will Kohli get a fair deal?". Yahoo! Cricket. Archived from the original on 18 May 2015. Retrieved 26 April 2015.
  54. "Another Kohli ton in a chase, another India win". ESPNcricinfo. 24 July 2013. Archived from the original on 4 June 2015. Retrieved 8 August 2014.
  55. "Statistics / Statsguru / V Kohli / One-Day Internationals". ESPNcricinfo. Archived from the original on 19 September 2015. Retrieved 28 June 2015.
  56. "Statistics / Statsguru / One-Day Internationals / Batting records". ESPNcricinfo. Archived from the original on 17 February 2015. Retrieved 28 June 2015.
  57. "The Rise and Rise of Virat Kohli". Verve Magazine. 21 June 2014. Archived from the original on 4 April 2015. Retrieved 1 June 2015.
  58. "Australia v India 2014: David Warner confrontation slammed by Indian media". Fox Sports AU. 12 December 2014. Retrieved 1 June 2015.
  59. "Vivian Richards Backs Virat Kohli's Aggressive Attitude". NDTV. Archived from the original on 9 July 2015. Retrieved 1 June 2015.
  60. "Shastri strongly defends Kohli's aggressive attitude". Business Standard India. Business Standard. Press Trust of India. 4 January 2015. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 1 June 2015.
  61. "For me what matters are runs that Virat Kohli scores: Sourav Ganguly". Times of India. Archived from the original on 14 May 2015. Retrieved 1 June 2015.
  62. "Virat Kohli Aggression Can be Counter-Productive for India in Australia: Sunil Gavaskar". NDTV. Archived from the original on 19 February 2015. Retrieved 1 June 2015.
  63. "Dhoni tells me not to cross the line of aggression: Kohli". Times of India. Archived from the original on 3 March 2018. Retrieved 1 June 2015.
  64. "The king and his heir". ESPNcricinfo. 3 November 2013. Archived from the original on 8 July 2014. Retrieved 9 July 2014.
  65. "Kohli makes a Tendulkar-like ton". ESPNcricinfo. 18 December 2013. Archived from the original on 4 June 2015. Retrieved 9 July 2014.
  66. "'Kohli reminds me of myself' - Viv Richards". ESPNcricinfo. 25 April 2013. Archived from the original on 23 October 2017. Retrieved 4 May 2015.
  67. "Virat Kohli only cricketer in Forbes' top 100 highest-paid athletes of 2020". Hindustan Times. 30 May 2020. Retrieved 3 June 2020.
  68. "'Sachin had more shots than Virat': Former India batter says he doesn't expect Kohli to play a Tendulkar-like SCG knock". Hindustan Times. Retrieved 15 January 2022.
  69. "Batting records | Test matches | Cricinfo Statsguru | ESPNcricinfo.com". Cricinfo. Retrieved 8 December 2021.
  70. "Fielding records | Test matches | Cricinfo Statsguru | ESPNcricinfo.com". Cricinfo. Retrieved 8 December 2021.
  71. "Batting records | One-Day Internationals | Cricinfo Statsguru | ESPNcricinfo.com". Cricinfo. Retrieved 8 December 2021.
  72. "Fielding records | One-Day Internationals | Cricinfo Statsguru | ESPNcricinfo.com". Cricinfo. Retrieved 8 December 2021.
  73. "Batting records | Twenty20 Internationals | Cricinfo Statsguru | ESPNcricinfo.com". Cricinfo. Retrieved 5 September 2021.
  74. "Fielding records | Twenty20 Internationals | Cricinfo Statsguru | ESPNcricinfo.com". Cricinfo. Retrieved 5 September 2021.
  75. 75.0 75.1 "World T20: Virat Kohli declared as Player of the Tournament". Hindustan Times. 3 April 2016. Retrieved 6 September 2021.
  76. "World T20, 2013/14 Cricket Team Records & Stats | ESPNcricinfo.com". Cricinfo. Retrieved 6 September 2021.
  77. "Records | One-Day Internationals | Batting records | Most hundreds in a career | ESPNcricinfo.com". Cricinfo. Retrieved 6 September 2021.
  78. "Records | Combined Test, ODI and T20I records | Batting records | Most hundreds in a career | ESPNcricinfo.com". Cricinfo. Retrieved 6 September 2021.
  79. "Fastest 10000 runs in ODI: Fastest batsmen to 10,000 ODI runs | Cricket News - Times of India". The Times of India. 1 June 2020. Retrieved 6 September 2021.
  80. "Virat Kohli brings up quickest 1000 ODI runs in a calendar year". India Today. 24 October 2018. Retrieved 6 September 2021.
  81. "Arjuna Award for Virat Kohli, PV Sindhu; Ronjan Sodhi gets Khel Ratna". NDTV. Archived from the original on 18 May 2015. Retrieved 12 May 2015.
  82. Sep 25, PTI / Updated; 2018; Ist, 21:59. "Virat Kohli, Mirabai Chanu bask in Khel Ratna glory | More sports News - Times of India". The Times of India. Retrieved 26 October 2021.CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  83. 83.0 83.1 "Virat Kohli bags two top honours at the ICC Awards". www.icc-cricket.com. Retrieved 28 December 2020.
  84. "ICC Awards: Virat Kohli named Cricketer of the Year". Archived from the original on 18 January 2018. Retrieved 18 January 2018.
  85. 85.0 85.1 85.2 "Kohli clean sweep of three major ICC awards". www.icc-cricket.com.
  86. "Virat Kohli named ICC ODI Player of the Year". The Times of India. 15 September 2012. Archived from the original on 5 November 2013. Retrieved 16 September 2012.
  87. "Kohli re-claims ODI award". Archived from the original on 18 January 2018. Retrieved 18 January 2018.
  88. "Virat Gautam Gambhir, Virat Kohli and MS Dhoni named in the ICC ODI team of the year". Times of India. 14 September 2012. Retrieved 11 March 2021.
  89. PTI. "Virat Kohli captain of ICC ODI team of 2016". @businessline. Retrieved 23 October 2021.
  90. "ICC Awards: Men's Test and ODI Teams of the Year 2017 announced". www.icc-cricket.com. Retrieved 23 October 2021.
  91. "Men's ODI Team of the Year". Archived from the original on 18 January 2018. Retrieved 18 January 2018.
  92. 92.0 92.1 "ICC announces men's Test and ODI Teams of the Year". www.icc-cricket.com. Retrieved 23 October 2021.
  93. "ICC Awards: Men's Test and ODI Teams of the Year 2017 announced". Archived from the original on 18 January 2018. Retrieved 18 January 2018.
  94. "Surprised at winning 'Spirit of Cricket' award after years of being under scanner: Virat Kohli - Times of India". The Times of India. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  95. 95.0 95.1 95.2 "Virat Kohli named captain in ICC Men's Test Team of the Decade, Ravichandran Ashwin included in the XI". India Today. Retrieved 27 December 2020.
  96. "Virat Kohli to receive Polly Umrigar Award, fourth time in his career". The Indian Express. 7 June 2018. Retrieved 6 September 2021.
  97. Desk, IBT Sports (7 June 2018). "Virat Kohli goes peerless with 4 Polly Umrigar Awards: List of winners at BCCI Awards". www.ibtimes.co.in. Retrieved 6 September 2021.
  98. http://m.wisdenindia.com/full-story.php?category=Wisden%20Cricketers’%20Almanack%202018&id=296545&[permanent dead link]
  99. "Virat Kohli named Wisden's 'Leading Cricketer' for third straight year - Times of India". The Times of India. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  100. "Virat Kohli wins Ceat Cricketer of the Year award". DNA India. 2 June 2014. Archived from the original on 4 June 2014. Retrieved 24 December 2015.
  101. "CEAT Cricket Awards: Virat Kohli wins International Cricketer of the Year and Best Batsman, Jasprit Bumrah Best Bowler". The Indian Express. 14 May 2019. Retrieved 6 September 2021.
  102. "King Kohli Bags a Brace". www.barmyarmy.com. 25 July 2018. Retrieved 28 November 2018.
  103. "CNN-News18 Indian of the Year 2017: Virat Kohli is Indian of the Year". News18. 30 November 2017. Retrieved 3 June 2020.
  104. "Virat Kohli to have stand named after him in Feroz Shah Kotla stadium". The Indian Express. 11 September 2019. Retrieved 6 September 2021.
  105. DelhiAugust 18, Press Trust of India New; August 18, 2019UPDATED; Ist, 2019 19:29. "Virat Kohli to have a stand named after him at Feroz Shah Kotla stadium in Delhi". India Today. Retrieved 26 October 2021.CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  106. 106.0 106.1 "ISL: Virat Kohli starts a new innings as FC Goa co-owner". Mid Day. 24 September 2014. Archived from the original on 25 September 2014. Retrieved 5 May 2015.
  107. "Virat Kohli: 25, Cricket star, co-owner of ISL team FC Goa". The Indian Express. 23 September 2014. Archived from the original on 29 June 2015. Retrieved 5 May 2015.
  108. "Kohli becomes co-owner of UAE Royals". The Hindu. 10 September 2015. Archived from the original on 3 March 2018. Retrieved 16 September 2015.
  109. "Virat Kohli becomes co-owner of PWL franchise Bengaluru Yodhas". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 21 March 2016. Retrieved 10 July 2016.
  110. Menon, Rashmi (21 November 2014). "Virat Kohli takes a 'WROGN' turn". The Economic Times. Archived from the original on 28 March 2015. Retrieved 28 May 2015.
  111. "Virat Kohli to invest Rs 90cr, set up chain of gyms". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 26 April 2015. Retrieved 5 May 2015.
  112. Malvania, Urvi (28 June 2016). "Virat Kohli promotes a healthy lifestyle; launches Stepathlon Kids". Business Standard India. Business Standard. Archived from the original on 3 August 2016. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  113. "Vivo ropes in Virat Kohli as brand ambassador ahead of IPL 2021". Business Standard India. Press Trust of India. 7 April 2021. Retrieved 8 April 2021.
  114. "Virat Kohli to start charity foundation for underprivileged kids". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 25 March 2013. Retrieved 31 May 2015.
  115. "Interview: Charity is a matter of personal passion, willingness and preference - Virat Kohli". DNA India. 12 May 2014. Archived from the original on 9 January 2015. Retrieved 31 May 2015.
  116. "Ebay and Save The Children setting up a charity auction with Virat Kohli". The Economic Times. Archived from the original on 30 October 2016. Retrieved 31 May 2015.
  117. "Virat Kohli, MS Dhoni to play charity match against Bollywood stars on June 4". The Indian Express. 3 June 2016. Archived from the original on 20 July 2016. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  118. "Virat Kohli makes history, becomes first Asian celebrity to touch 150 million followers mark on Instagram". timesnownews.com. Retrieved 3 September 2021.
  119. "Virat Kohli First Indian Cricketer To Reach 150 Million Followers On Instagram". NDTV Sports. Retrieved 16 September 2021.
  120. DelhiMarch 11, India Today Web Desk New; March 11, 2020UPDATED; Ist, 2020 18:46. "Just another person: What Tim Paine's mom said about Virat Kohli before India series". India Today. Retrieved 19 October 2021.CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  121. "Virat Kohli's Super V: Everything you should know about the animated series". The Indian Express. 5 November 2019. Retrieved 4 September 2021.
  122. Team, DNA Web (25 September 2018). "Virat Kohli said 'the most beautiful thing' about Sachin Tendulkar on Mega Icons show". DNA India. Retrieved 4 September 2021.

Bibliography[edit | edit source]

External links[edit | edit source]